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Easter Eggs Part I



Chocolate eggs, a symbol of Easter, are a sign of birth and new life. I remember my happiness on Easter Sunday, when I was a child. Now, my happiness is making my own eggs! Yes, it was my first time and it was so much fun.

I made 3 flavors: Belgian white chocolate with M&M'S; Belgian semisweet chocolate with almond praliné brigadeiro filling and Belgian semisweet chocolate with coconut filling. I also made some bonbons with the same flavors.

The secret of a beautiful egg is the chocolate tempering. Every brand of chocolate requires different tempering temperatures. When done correctly the chocolate will be perfectly creamy, smooth, and shiny. David Lebovitz explains how to do here.


Handmade chocolate eggs are simple to make and are a great occasion to cook with your family. 







Chocolate Easter Egg
(how to from here)


You will need 400-500g of chocolate, depending on the size of your moulds. Break the chocolate into similarly sized chunks, so it will melt easily and evenly.
It's best to melt the chocolate slowly in a bowl over a pan of hot water, rather than on the hob - you don't want the chocolate to get warmer than 42ºC (44ºC for dark chocolate). If you don't have a cooking thermometer, dip the crook of your little finger in the chocolate – if it's barely warm, you're doing fine. If you want a glossier finish to your egg, take a few extra minutes to temper it.
Using a ladle fill the egg mould about a quarter full with chocolate, then tilt and twirl the mould until the chocolate covers the whole thing. Tip the excess back into the bowl. Do the same with the other half.
Wipe around the edges if any chocolate escapes the mould.
Leave the first layer of chocolate to set. 
Once the first layer of chocolate is set in the egg mould, pour in another ladleful and swirl the chocolate round again. You'll need to do this three of four times until the egg is thick enough. After the second time you can add the filling. Don't allow the excess to pool in the bottom of the mould – you'll end up with fragile edges and rock-hard centre.
Put the egg halves into the fridge to set. After an hour or two, take them out and gently but firmly pull the corners of the mould – the egg will pop out easily
Using a teaspoon or pastry brush, paint the edges of the two halves with melted chocolate and glue them together. Put the whole egg back in the fridge for 5 or ten minutes to firm up.


Almond Praliné
Vegetable oil cooking spray 
1/2 cup sugar 
1/3 cup  almonds

  • Spray a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray; set aside. Bring sugar and 1/4 cup water to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Swirl pan to dissolve sugar. Wash down sides of pan with a wet pastry brush to prevent crystals from forming. Boil until sugar turns light amber, about 7 minutes. Add almonds and salt; cook, stirring constantly, until almonds are toasted and caramel turns dark amber. Pour onto prepared sheet. Let cool completely.
  • Break into shards. Transfer to a food processor; pulse until finely ground with a few larger pieces remaining.

Chocolate Brigadeiro

1 can sweetened condensed milk (395g)
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
100g chocolate

Mix the condensed milk, butter and chocolate in a saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring constantly – when the bottom of the pan starts to show and the mixture is a bit thicker, remove from heat
 and set aside to cool.


Sweetened condensed milk coconut

1 can sweetened condensed milk (395g)
200g unsweetened coconut

Mix the condensed milk and coconut in a heavy-bottom saucepan and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly – when the bottom of the pan starts to show and the mixture is a bit thicker (20-25 minutes), remove from heat and n set aside to cool.

Easter Eggs Part II

Marolo Candies and Ice Cream

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